No longer another “first blog” experience

In the beginning of this semester, I described this blog as just another “first blog” experience. At that point, I had no idea how to design my theme, format a post, or make sure that my picture placement made sense. Now that the semester is over, I am able to say that this experience has given me writing, research, and computer experience that has already helped me towards reaching my goals. For a few years, I have always said that I will start my own website, but the daunting fact that I had no idea how to go about doing this halted my plans. After navigating WordPress and learning how to properly research and write about different subjects, I have been able to take steps in that direction. The research that we have done in this class has also inspired me to include a section on my new blog about “culture”, or things that people actually need to hear about. Gentrification and architectural exclusion are real issues in our own city, but until I took this class, I was not aware of just how problematic they are. I have been able to see Atlanta in a new light and can now spread awareness myself, even if it is just through conversation with my friends. Now that the semester is over, I can take all this new knowledge and experience and apply it to finally starting my own website. (And start my “just  another second blog” experience.)   Laurel...

Digital Built Environment Description: Wabe vs NY Times: The Ad Wars

Wabe vs The New York Times: The Ad Wars Intro When you first sign on to Wabe.org, it seems like any other news source. It has everything that makes up the basic formula for a news site: headlines, pictures, and news categories.  However, when you then visit NYTimes.com, the difference is clear. Besides the basic formula, the site’s prominent ads and advanced page design make it obvious that the budget and outreach of the NYTimes is far greater than that of the local NPR station, Wabe. According to “How Americans Get TV News At Home”  71% of Americans watch local televisions news versus the 38% that get their news from national cable networks (Olmstead). So if a significantly larger amount of people are supporting their local news sources over national sources, why do news sources like The New York Times  have more money to spend on web design and outreach than our local sources? Also, if The New York Times can afford to upkeep its unique web design, then why do they push their consumers more than Wabe for monetary support? Background Wabe’s support options | Learn more here The New York Times  was created in 1851 and has since become one of the country’s oldest and most prominent news sources, boasting a number of 1.09 million digital subscribers in late 2015 (Statista). Wabe is a local NPR station in Atlanta that focuses on local news. While it’s 88 fluctuating subscribers as of March 2016 aren’t much, they have innovative ways for consumers to support them (“Wabe Atlanta Subscribers 90 Days Stats”). These ways include volunteering, monetary donations, and donating your...

Wabe vs NY Times: The Ad Wars 1

The brightly colored ads pictured above are purposely created to contrast in color with the black and white font of The New York Times’ website. The site’s ads urge readers to subscribe. Using consumer tracking technology, they have been able to tell that I am a student based on my internet history and have reccomended a student...
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