Built Environment Analysis

Although Atlanta has its share of problems, However the city’s history and culture demand that it still be recognized as an Icon. Atlanta, Georgia has long dealt with inequality and homelessness but the city has an incredible amount of historical significance and over time has become the home to many important cultural landmarks. Atlanta is the location for the headquarters of the Coca-Cola Company, as well as the headquarters for the Centers for Disease Control. On a smaller scale Atlanta is home to the Center for Civil and Human Rights, a museum   The city is full of famous landmarks, a few of which I have gone into depth with in my built environment descriptions.  The Georgian Terrace is an old luxury hotel that is one of the many places of cultural significance in Atlanta. Opening for business in 1911, the Terrace was planned to be a reminder of Parisian hotels of the time. The Georgian Terrace has laid out the carpet for a slew of famous individuals “including F. Scott Fitzgerald, President Calvin Coolidge, and actors and actresses such as Tallulah Bankhead. Arthur Murray, then a Georgia Tech student, taught his first dance classes there in the 1920’s”(Rhetta)   Speaking of old attractions to the city, the Fox Theatre is an Historic landmark that’s been a part of Atlanta since the theatre’s original conception in 1928. The old theatre has been on the brink of shutting down time and time again and for a while actually did close its doors, but the spirit and efforts of the city managed to revive it once and for all. Doing this...

Exterior Built Environment

First sight of the entrance to the Georgian Terrace gives off a very cozy impression, inserted into the block as it is, in fact as I walked towards the supposed location of the Terrace I was initially confused, I could not seem to find it. My map seemed to be leading me into a restaurant called the Livingston, which I would later realize was a part of the Georgian Terrace. The Livingston was a beautiful building with glass and stone mingling in an ornate way that seemed to encourage only the most sophisticated to enter, not so much as to frighten off the random passerby, but enough to comfort its customers.  The only thing that convinced me that I was nearing my destination was the sight of the Fox Theatre, a building I knew was close to the Terrace. As I continued walking and passed the Livingston I saw a gap between it and the next building on the block, turning to face the gap I was surprised and struck by the appearance of the Georgian Terrace’s Entrance. It seemed immediately more elegant than its surroundings, almost as if it was tucked away into its own private corner of luxury, which in a way it was. The brick of the walls somehow matching perfectly with the glass tower that I somehow only noticed at this moment. The building gives off a feel of elegance and sophistication that is almost daunting at first glance, daunting but still intriguing. An air that implied that the rich and famous would be perfectly suited to the...

Digital Built Environment

Built from the first moment to be dedicated to showing visitors the connections between the Civil Rights Movement and the Human Rights Movement, the Center for Civil and Human Rights has been doing just that for the last nine years. The creators of the Center are Evelyn Lowery and Andrew Young, a legend in the civil rights community and a former Ambassador for the United Nations respectively. As I navigated The Center’s website I was let in on a bit of the history of the building itself and, more importantly the movements that the Center is dedicated to. While searching the different sections of the website I found that it makes special mention of the UDHR, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Written after World War Two, the UDHR is a document that, using its 30 articles, serves as a “set of principles for governments to use to remain accountable for their duty to protect the rights and freedoms of all people.” The next portion of the website to catch my eye was the “Take Action” heading. The heading leads to  a whole section purposed to sharing all of the different ways one might learn more about or get further involved in Civil and Human Rights issues. Some of the links point to encyclopedias; some to resource pages; still others to archives of information. The website also includes information regarding the Center’s events and programs as well as information for setting up school trips, like guides and packets for teachers to use as support for those...

Annotated Bibliography #10

“Atlanta-History.” Atlanta-History. Atlanta Broadway, n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2016. <http://atlanta.broadway.com/history/>. The article is a history of the Fox Theatre, with a focus on its beauty, with its magnificent and ornate design, and the struggles the theatre has gone through to stay open. The article goes over the problems had with financing the plan for building it, problems which eventually required the help of William Fox, a man who had been building movie palaces across the country. The article continues on to the Fox Theatre’s original bankruptcy after only 125 weeks of service. The Fox managed to bounce back from this early setback and prospered for decades as “one of Atlanta’s finest movie houses”. This would not last however as a changes in movie industry would slowly put the Fox Theatre out of business. The theatre managed to be reborn under the ownership of Atlanta Landmarks, an organization that spent years fundraising enough to save the building and eventually put it back on the path to being a profitable business, going as far as submitting the documents necessary to have it named an historic...

Annotated Bibliography #9

“The Fox Story – The Fox Theatre.” The Fox Theatre. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2016. <http://foxtheatre.org/the-fox-story/>. This article is written as a history of the Fox Theatre. The theatre’s history starts in 1928, when it was first imagined as a location for Atlanta’s Shriners organization, and in the minds of the organization’s leaders the theatre would be a magnificent homage to their own social status. In the end however even with their status the project’s design, inspired by temples of the far east, was more expensive than they could manage. As the building neared its completion they leased the property to a William Fox, a man who had made a fortune by creating and managing large scale “movie palaces”. The beautiful Fox theatre was and is a beloved feature of the town, it has had its share of problems in its long history though.  The Great Depression forced its owners into bankruptcy and put it on the auction block where it was sold for a a fraction of its original building price. even in new hands it still maintained its loyal audience until the eventual rise of the more modern movie theaters pushed the Fox Theatre, and other movie palaces like it, out of favor. Even as its doors closed, the Fox managed to still captivate an audience, A non-Profit, Atlanta Landmarks, was created and millions of dollars were raised through donations, eventually resulting in the of reopening the theatre’s...
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