Conclusion

A Conclusion Restates thesis in a more in depth way Synthesizes evidence/claims Can present a call to action Can request further studying    

Rough Draft One

The Experience Economy Here is a common question: “If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you go?” When asked this question, what exactly shapes the answers that people respond with? Well, the chosen destination has to be appealing in some way to them. Environments are actually made to be appealing to others for the very reason of capturing the attention of strangers for the enhancement of their own experience economies. The experience economy, as scholars Marling, Jensen, and Kiib assert, is centered on the idea of creating a stimulating environment with attractions to demonstrate a higher standard of living, and thus inviting visitors to engage in a given space. Typically, an environment that actively participates in the experience economy includes some level of Disneyfication—“anything that looks negative is removed and the facts are buried” (Matusitz & Palermo 97). In order to appeal to people, cities are beautified and promoted to unrealistic or biased extremes. The incentive for Disneyfication is actually economic growth within certain corporate businesses as well as the overall environment. Due to healthy competition, this phenomenon is global. Atlanta, Georgia most evidently began its Disneyfication through an experience economy around the year 1988 according to scholars from the American Sociological Association Gallagher and Lacy. From then on, Atlanta has adopts several attraction sites and become the home for major corporations like CNN and Coca-Cola. In this way, Atlanta is acknowledged for its thorough growth and can actually be called a “fun” place to visit—or at least that is the goal. Without taking the initiative to build up an appealing environment, Atlanta would not be...

Built Environment Analysis Outline

The building of the experience economy through recreational/tourist attractions in Atlanta has caused economic growth, an increase in diversity, and an increase in tourism. I. Intro a. What is an experience economy? b. Disneyfication c. What caused the experience economy to spread globally? d. When does Atlanta most evidently begin to build up its experience economy? II. The Symbolic Effect of the Economy a. Present commonly known pieces of architecture, or spaces whether natural or man-made, around the world. (i.e. Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Great Wall, Niagara Falls) b. Elaborate on how the pieces function not only to make places distinctive, but also function as symbols for experience economies found in certain regions as tactics to promote tourism. c. Transition into symbols found in Atlanta like the Georgia Aquarium, the World of Coca-Cola, the CDC, King Memorial/Civil Rights District III. The Promotion of Recreational Spending through City Design a. Limited and paid parking promotes an increase of walkers and public transportation in Atlanta. b. Provide a brief explanation of Marta. Explain more so on the Atlanta Streetcar that was recently established. c. Peachtree Street extends through many of Atlanta’s attractions. d. How walkable is Atlanta? IV. Demographic Changes in Atlanta a. Present census statistics–increase in some racial groups and gentrification within black community b. Globalization in the environment c. Accommodation in the environment (relates to walkability, public transit) V. Conclusion a. Draw conclusions and connect the evidence presented to support the...

Underwater Experience at the Georgia Aquarium

                    The Georgia Aquarium is all about experience. The space heavily relies on visual to capture its audience, but also integrates other forms of interaction. In order to invite visitors, the space is made to be comfortable for those occupy it. Before an environment can truly be comfortable, it must provide accommodation. Therefore, through the way the aquarium accommodates its guests imply the types of people it was established for. A space built for experience, however, cannot succeed simply through accommodation, but also through capturing and engaging its visitors. The interior of the Georgia Aquarium convincingly demonstrates this phenomenon. The photo on the far left displays a tank that greatly exceeds the limits of the picture frame. The picture is filled with the color blue which imitates an ocean. The space allows the guests to be surrounded by a deep hue of blue which should make them feel as though they are intertwined with the underwater life. This visual effect not only gives an impression of how vast the ocean is, but also involves the visitors as they comfortably sit on the carpeted floors and gaze into everything the tank–the living movie screen–has to offer. The visual experience that this room provides is highly effective. The adjacent image shown in the middle demonstrates a tangible experience the aquarium offers. The tank is uncovered, leveled at a personal height, and has a sign above it that invites guests to feel the starfish inside the tank using two fingers. Within the frame of the picture, there are two youthful-looking hands on the stone surrounding...
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