Georgia Dome’s Faults Lead to Mercedes-Benz Stadium

The Georgia Dome is the largest indoor venue available in the state of Georgia. It is located in the heart of Downtown Atlanta and is a premier key to Downtown Atlanta’s economic and tourism success. Since September 6, 1992 the Georgia Dome has been standing and serving as a host for live music concerts, conventions, sports events, and even Monster Truck rallies. The Dome is broken into multiple levels: the floor, club level, the suites, and the upper level seating. The higher up in the building, the lower the ticket prices (excluding box seating). The layout of the site separates those who pay more to watch an event from those who pay less. For instance, those who purchase tickets to view an event from the upper level cannot access food options on the club (second) level. This is unfair because the food options are the exact same building wide, while also helpful because sometimes celebrities may be seated in the club level and suites and do not want to mingle with such large amounts of people. A rendering of the proposed Mercedes-Benz Stadium taken from mercedesbenzstadium.com The Georgia Dome is open and easy to navigate as long as the tickets you bought were the most expensive. Suite level tickets also come with access to things around the entire venue whereas third level guests cannot access things other than the first floor and their level. The large walkways prevent clusters of people and gathering which creates for easy access and quick and safe evacuation if necessary. To also increase ease of access and safe evacuation the Georgia Dome and it’s...

Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments

In her essay “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments”, Mary E. Hocks discusses how digital environments are designed with features like “audience stance, transparency, and hybridity” (629). The ” visual and interactive nature of native hypertext and multimedia writing” (629) makes it difficult for scholars to distinguish words from visuals, as Hocks suggests “Interactive digital texts can blend words and visuals  talk and text, and authors and audiences in ways that are recognizably postmodern (630). She references ” Gary Heba’s delineation of how html authoring mirrors rhetorical processes for composition” (630) and ” Patricia Sullivan’s arguments that expand our definitions of electronic writing to include graphics, screen design, and other media form” (630). The work of early professionals in “technical communication” that “demonstrated how rhetorical decisions impact the visual design of an online document or system” (630) alerted scholars  to think about the visual aspect of writing. Anne Wysocki stated that “computer-based interactive media can now blend text and images so thoroughly that they are indistinguishable on the screen (2010)” (630). These arguments have convinced teachers to redefine what we consider to be  writing. Hocks introduces the idea of interpreting new media as “hybrid forms” . As students we “look at artifacts such as online games or Web sites” (630) and we make  “assumptions about gender, age, nationality, or other identity categories” (630). Hocks states that all writing is hybrid that “it is at once verbal, spatial, and visual.” (631).  As interactive digital media has become a part of college writing courses, writing is now  “internetworked writing”-writing that involves the intertwining of production, interaction, and publication in the online classroom or professional workplace...

Ponce City Market Built Environment Description (Interior)

I arrived at Ponce City Market, which used to be the historic Sears, Roebuck & Co. building, around 6:36 pm. I walk into the main food court and I see various restaurants and shops and groups of people walking around and eating. I walk up the stairs towards the back and arrive on the second floor. I sit on at a round wooden table with metallic accents and chairs. I observe the environment below. The design seems industrial with high ceilings and hard wood floors and open railings for bystanders to lounge on. I see groups of people from various areas and they all appear to belong to the upper and middle class based on the business-like attire (suits, luxury brands, etc.) The male-to-female gender ratio seems to be equal, however they tend to only engage within their own gender.  Gigantic black light fixtures hang from white concrete. The building appears to be inspired by urban design. In the distance I hear the chatter of people, salsa music, and the hum of human activity. I can smell food cooking The lighting is dim and low with no windows or natural light which creates a dungeon like ambiance. On the second floor there are a few shops and a gallery area for artist exhibitions as well as a sign pointing to the Beltline. The materials throughout the market appear to be industrial such as steel, wood, and brightly colored paint. These features give the market an urban vibe but also clean sophistication that attracts both young and older people. On the first floor there is an display case which shows a...

Atlanta’s “Best” Hair Salon

Atlanta Magazines best hair salon winner Atlanta Magazine chose a salon which they felt portrayed Atlanta’s assorted funky and eccentric, yet dapper and sharp modern hairstyles. The salon offers a slim selection of styles that aren’t a great representation of Atlanta’s creativity. The woman in this photo is beautiful and her style is sleekly astounding. However, many women of Atlanta can not get their hair to fit in such a way. Is this the “best” hair salon if only few styles are available for certain hair...
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